International Relations

International Relations

 

Courses in International Relations examine how nations and other international political bodies relate to one another. Attention is paid both to "international relations", the study of patterns of interaction/ engagement/ competition/ power between nations or groups of nations, and to "political organizations", the study of attempts formally to co-ordinate and integrate the conduct of nations and sub-national groups. The effects of organizations such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the World Bank, as well as a variety of international (often critical) advocacy groups are examined and assessed. Some courses focus attention upon issues of the environment, the theories and institutions of international justice, Canadian foreign policy, international political economy, and the work of the U.N.

POLS 2683 GLOBAL POLITICS
This course examines tensions between states and globalization. We review historical and changing patterns of conflict and cooperation in the international system. We study global governance organizations like the United Nations and processes of international law. We discuss issues like terrorism, nuclear proliferation and peacekeeping and humanitarian intervention.

POLS 2783 GLOBAL ISSUES
This course covers the new generation of global issues and problem-solving processes involving states and other actors beginning with the global economy: trade, development, aid and debt. We then study actors and processes in other global regimes including human security, the environment, gender and human rights.

POLS 3073 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: MIDDLE EAST
The course will focus on contemporary international relations in the Middle East, covering issues related to regional wars, ethnic and religious conflicts, refugees, humanitarian issues, trade, oil production, and other matters, with the goal of understanding how international relations of the region shape these issues. 

POLS 3083 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
The basic principles of international law are examined in the context of contemporary global politics. The evolution of international law and its application among and across states and societies will be studied from a variety of theoretical, conceptual and normative perspectives. Particular emphasis will be placed on the laws of war; humanitarian law; and international criminal justice. Prerequisite: Second-year standing (i.e. >24h completed).

POLS 3173 MODEL UNITED NATIONS SIMULATION
The Model United Nations Simulation course provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with international diplomacy through simulations. Students will learn about the United Nations system, its procedures, the art of diplomacy, and resolution and position paper drafting, while also developing their analytic, research, public speaking, conflict resolution and negotiation skills through weekly UN crises simulations. Prerequisite: Third-year standing (i.e. >54h completed), and at least two of POLS 1403, 2683, 2783

POLS 3183 U.N. & CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL GOVERNANCE 
The social, cultural, political and economic functions the United Nations in the international system will be examined. Specifically, the growth of Human Security and Humanitarian Intervention will be explored in light of the U.N.’s recent politicization. Next, the emergence of global governance models that include other international institutions and actors will be explored. Finally, the emerging horizons of contemporary assemblages of governance will be explored. Prerequisite: Second-year standing (i.e. >24h completed).

POLS 3483 GLOBALIZATION: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES
The course will provide an overview of the theoretical foundations and historical developments which form the context of the ongoing processes of neo-liberal economic globalization from post WWII to the present day. It will also address critical political, economic, environmental, feminist, and developing country perspectives on globalization. Prerequisite: Second-year standing (i.e. >24h completed).

POLS 3583 NEW ISSUES IN SECURITY
The course discusses new concepts and challenges for security. Security now embraces military, environmental, economic, social and political sectors. Securitizing problems such as terrorism, gender, human rights, narcotics trade, organized crime, pandemics, and internet abuse has major consequences for state policies, international relations and international organization. Prerequisite: POLS 2683 or 2783 with a minimum grade of B, or permission of the instructor.

POLS 3683 BIOPOLITICS 
Biological life is now a target of local, national and global politics. This course examines the politicization of life in war, development, public health, resource management, human rights and international law. Relationships with sovereignty, markets, nature, technology and culture are also explored. Historical and contemporary texts are used to examine positive, negative and post-biopolitical futures. Prerequisite: POLS 1403 and third-year standing (i.e. >54h completed).

POLS 3783 POP CULTURE & WORLD POLITICS
This course explores the inter-text between popular culture (i.e. Film, Music, Television, Performance and Painting) and the study, practice and production of world politics. The course builds on the cultural turn in international relations and develops the importance of aesthetics in appreciation and politicizing contemporary global drama. Prereq: 1403 or permission of the instructor.

POLS 3843 THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL RESISTANCE
This course explores the emergence of global forms of resistance. It explores the political theory of resistance, then looks at different local and/or national examples of resistance, as well as those forms of resistance that seek to specifically address global issues and/or define themselves as strictly global actors. This course counts towards the political theory and international relations stream. Prerequisite: Third-year standing (i.e. >54h completed).

POLS 3883 POLITICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT
We study Canadian and international environmental politics to identify and policy processes at the national and intergovernmental levels. We review the reluctance of the federal government to lead on Canadian environmental issues. We then evaluate international regimes on ozone, climate, species, whaling, forests and hazardous waste. Can sovereign states, divided on North-South concerns, cooperate on environmental problems? Prerequisite: Second-year standing (i.e. >24h completed).

POLS 3983 THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO WORLD POLITICS
This course covers the key theories of international relations and world politics. Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Feminism, Constructivism and Post-Structuralism will be explored. Readings will be selected from classic and contemporary writers. Prerequisite: Second-year standing (i.e. >24h completed).

POLS 4143 APPLIED INTERNATIONAL ETHICS
This course is a critical exploration of ethical dilemmas in contemporary international politics. A special emphasis will be placed on cosmopolitan and communitarian approaches to issues such as international justice, war, terrorism, global poverty, sovereignty, human rights, women's rights, the environment, and humanitarian affairs and intervention. Prerequisite: Third-year standing (i.e. >54h completed) and B in POLS 2683 or 2783, or permission of the instructor.

POLS 4483 POLITICS OF GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES
This seminar explores the global political implications of new advances in science and technology. Specific attention is paid to the impact of cyber-technology, bio-technology, and nano-technology on political concepts like war, security, human rights, global governance and democracy. If our future is technological, what becomes of life?  Prerequisite: 54h and POLS 2683 or 2783 with a minimum grade of B, or permission of the instructor.

POLS 4883 HUMAN RIGHTS
This course examines what human rights mean, why they matter, and how they have come to influence contemporary global politics. We explore the political, legal and ethical dimensions of human rights standards from a variety of perspectives in Political Science and the subfield of International Relations. Prerequisite: 54h and POLS 2683 or 2783 with a minimum grade of B, or permission of the instructor.

POLS 4983 THE POLITICS OF ASIA/PACIFIC
This seminar explores modern and global issues affecting the Asia/Pacific community. The course explores three important analytic frameworks: global/regional, “glocal” and local. The global/regional focus explores institutional governance, security and economics issues before and after the Cold War. The “glocal” focus develops the competing flows that complicate the global/regional framework. The local focus explores how global connections emerge within local events. Prerequisite: POLS 2683 or POLS 2783 with a minimum grade of B+, or permission of the instructor.

IDST 2213 PEACE STUDIES 1
This course aims to give students a better general understanding of the dynamics of conflict and peace. They attempt to sensitize students to the different dimensions of conflict and peace, of their causes and effects, and of the obstacles and opportunities for meaningful change in the contemporary world. These courses may be taken for political science credit.

IDST 2223 PEACE STUDIES 2
These courses aim to give students a better general understanding of the dynamics of conflict and peace. They attempt to sensitize students to the different dimensions of conflict and peace, of their causes and effects, and of the obstacles and opportunities for meaningful change in the contemporary world. These courses may be taken for political science credit.

IDST 4186 PEACEKEEPING:  CRIT PERSPECTIVES
This course examines all the elements of modern peacekeeping from consolidating security to ensuring good governance and promoting economic rehabilitation. It also looks at the major players involved on both the military and civilian sides including NGOs and presents a series of case studies of peacekeeping missions. May be offered for credit in political science.